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the country's capacity for self inflicted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and points out there is always a nightmare of acquiring use -- terrorists acquiring and using these weapons of mass destruction that nothing would give them greater satisfaction that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it, since 9/11, the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries , has remained, frankly, open and free. we continued to have super bowl's and people travel abroad and robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use the analogy of it is like a hurricane. forecasting weather a potential storm and we're battening down the hatches and a few limited places. if the storm passes, great, but this administration is leaning forward and a way i think is professionally responsible and they are being advised not just by political advisers but also the cia -- one of my old agenci
to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wagood morning. >> good morning. >> the president says al qaeda has been hammered. he said they are on their way to defeat. from a messaging standpoint, how tricky is it to send that reassuring message at the same time you are evacuating americans? >> i think they are te directly linked. there is clear intelligence that the administration has received that these embassies are being targeted overseas. there is a clear oh effort by the administration to use the drone strikes against what they see as a
senior al qaeda leaders and no warning since the killing of osama bin laden in may of 2011. something serious they've heard. i also think this is the reaction of the benghazi scandal. the administration does want to look like it's lax on security and not being aggressive enough. i think they're also being very, very broad in terms of shutting down so many embassies to be careful politically. >> if something else were to happen, of course, a lot of people critical of not having done enough. mark, i want to turn to you on this. we heard a lot over the last decade about how much al qaeda has been weakened by the war on terror, but does this contradict that? do these closures suggest they are stronger than we've been led to believe? >> i don't want to say it's contradicted and david has put his finger on it. the fact of the matter is we've always known despite the killing of osama bin laden that there's been a series of franchise organizations directly related to al qaeda. they've been in the caucuses in the north africa and the al qaeda which committed attacks in amgeria, as well as in l
who was formerly osama bin laden's secretary. we know that there was chatter. but we don't know the most important things. exactly where, exactly when. so we've seen a blanket response in much of the muslim world and the question is how long can you keep this up. these kind of attacks, these militants, aren't going to be deterred for very long. this might throw off their game. it might, according to analysts we've been speaking to, cause them to change their timing but al qaeda in the iranian peninsula has been there for several years and has been very aggressive for the last several years. >> pete williams, we know that they were increasing security on flights coming from overseas to the united states. they don't see a domestic component to this. but a lot of people are wondering, we know that osama bin laden stopped his people from using cell phones. so what kind of communications -- what kifbd ch kind of chatt eter is intercept presumably from the nsa? >> we don't know if this is on the phone, is it e-mails or some other kind of communication we aren't thinking about. i'm tol
succeeded osama bin laden zawahiri. the two men reportedly agreed that they wanted to do something big. timed to the end of the muslim holy month of ramadan which is right now. and that's what led the united states to close 19 embassies. there they are on the map and consulates in the mideast and africa. there's still a lot that remains unknown including which target. over the weekend, one thing clear from every lawmaker and official with knowledge of the attack, nobody's crying wolf here. this is one of the most serious threats in years. >> been an awful lot of hatter out there, chatter means conversations among terrorists about the planning that's going on, very reminiscent of what we saw pre-9/11. this is the most serious threat that i've seen in the last several years. >> we need to know and realize we're living in an increasingly dangerous world and this many specific threat that we've been briefed on over and over again has reached a new level. >> i must say this is probably one of the most specific incredible threats i've seen perhaps since 9/11 because of the specificity, becau
. oral-b. life opens up when you do. al-qaeda is on the path of defeat and quad squad dead. and osama bin laden is dead. >> well, throughout the president's campaign for reelection last year, we heard him talk about the decimation of al-qaeda. here's what the president said in the press conference on friday. >> core al-qaeda is on its heels and decimated and i also said that al-qaeda and other extremist have matacicized in to regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> last week, the state department closed 19 american outpost in the mideast and africa and evacuated the embassy in yemen and warned americans not to travel to pakistan and evacuated nonemergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in pakistan. all because of terrorist threats. gary burn sten served as chief on three occasion and led counter terrorism deployments. and he has spent a career hunting down al-qaeda and author of a book jaw breaker the attack on bin laden and al-qaeda. gary, thank you for being here. >> (applause) >> we closed all of the embassy and consulateso all over the middle east or africa. good or b
. >> al qaeda has been decimated. >> osama bin laden is dead. >> well, throughout the president's campaign for re-election last year we heard him talk about the decimation of al qaeda. but here's what the president said in his press conference on friday. >> core al qaeda is on its heels, has been decimated. but what i also said was that al qaeda and other extremists have metastasized into regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> last week the state department closed 19 american outposts in the mideast and africa, and they evacuated the u.s. embassy in yemen. this week they warned americans not to travel to pakistan and they evacuated non-emergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in pakistan. all because of terrorist threats. gary burnson say decorated former cia officer who served as station chief on three separate occasions and led several of the agency's most important counterterrorism deployments. he spent his career hunting down al qaeda. he's also the author of a book, awbreaker: the attack on bin laden and al qaeda." gary joins me now. i appreciate you being with me. w
said about the state of al qaeda the last year. take a look. >> today, al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> for al qaeda is a shell of its former self. groups must be dealt with. >> the united states is never going to retreat from the world. >> we don't get terrorized. >> senator, a moment ago, you said al qaeda is on the rise. you are not subjecting that al qaeda is stronger than it was pre9/11. >> i'm saying they me taft sized in a way they may pose threat threats throughout the middle east, they can destabilize missions, have acts of terror literally everywhere and there the perception throughout the mid aefeasdle east that there i policy and that there is accommodation it that reality. when they believe that, then you are going to see extremist element on the rise and clearly they are throughout the middle east. action of closing embassies shows they are mounting threats everywhere in the middle east against the united states of america and they are playing in ways that is going to pose challenge to the united states for years to come. >> you talked earlier about r
aggressive when you look on the policy of drones, going in and getting osama bin laden, something the bush administration failed to do. and he's alsoing more cautious. if you look at the way we dealt with libya and egypt, sort of backing off and sort of supporting what we saw as the goals of the arab street without putting boots on the ground, so this president who was famously cautious about iraq is now in an awkward position. the things we were told about saddam hussein are actually true in libya, and we have this caution. >> we are talking about the republicans in their her to the president, a lot of people were questioning where they were yesterday at the march on washington, the celebration. we have dr. martin luther king's speech yesterday, but i want to show -- i'm sorry. we don't have that sound, but what i do have is the information that john boehner and eric cantor were invited to be there, and they decided not to be there. mlk was a registered republican, wasn't he? >> according to one family member. >> his father was. >> his father was. >> why would republicans take a distant a
the state department has issued a worldwide travel alert for americans, it's the first since osama bin laden was killed. it warns terrorists may elect to use a variety of means and weapons and target both official and private interests. that warning in effect through august. security is also being increased across the u.s. out of what authorities are calling an abundance of caution although they say there is no specific threat to the homeland and joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey says the threat is specific and serious. >> a significant threat stream and we're reacting to it. >> is the threat to employee up an embassy, a consulate or something else? >> that part of it is unspecified, but the intent seems clear. the intent is to attack western, not just u.s. interests. >> now, the focus is on the al qaeda branch in yemen where experts say the terror group is on the rise. we have complete coverage for you. nbc's kristen well kearse at the white house and nbc news foreign news correspondent richard engel is in cairo. what's the latest there. >> reporter: i'm still struck by that map
other than osama bin laden's successor. a shutdown has been extended. 19 american diplomatic embassies in the middle east and africa will remain closed for the rest of this week. chris lawrence is joining us now, he's got more on the threat, the u.s. response. what's the latest? >> reporter: local security teams have installed extra blast walls outside some american embassies and a newly formed quick reaction team of 500 marines is now ready to deploy within four hours from its base in spain. while u.s. officials still don't know if it involves embassies or planes, trains or bases, it's clear why they're telling the americans to take it seriously. the cascade of warnings was triggered by intercepted communication, which is now being revealed as a direct order from al qaeda's leader. cnn has learned he ordered his new deputy in yemen to basically do something and launch an attack. that deputy high on the u.s. target list. along with another yemeni, al qaeda's master bomb maker. >> the threat emanates from and maybe focused on occurring in the arabian peninsula rather, but it could poten
the people who have drones landing in their homes. that is more grief than osama bin laden? i don't think so, rush. coming up. why the north carolina governor thinks he can give cookies to his opponents after lying to them in the campaign and signing a new very restrictive abortion law. [ male announcer ] these days, a small business can save by sharing. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ folks have suffered from frequent heartburn. but getting heartburn and then treating day after day is a thing of the past. block the acid with prilosec otc, and don't get heartburn in the first place. [ male announcer ] one pill ea
. that is more grief than osama bin laden? i don't think so, rush. coming up. why the north carolina governor thinks he can give cookies to his opponents after lying to them in the campaign and signing a new very restrictive abortion law. the governor crossed the street, carrying a plate of cookies and reportedly told a woman "these are for you, god bless you." protesters placed the plate of cookies back at the mansion gates with a note reading governor mccrory, we'll take women's health over cookies. protesters say governor mccrory is breaking a promise he clearly made on the campaign trail last year. >> this past year, state lawmakers passed the women's right to no act, adding legislation making it more restrictive to get abortions in north carolina. if you're elected governor, what restrictions on abortion would you agree to sign. i'll start with you, mr. mccrory. >> none. >> all right. joining me now are elise hogue, i wonder why would the governor in that debate give such a clear answer, if this is what he was going to end up doing. what was he thinking back then? >> you know, i think he
between the man who succeeded osama bin laden as the head of al qaeda central and a former personal aide to bin laden and who is also the head of al qaeda's satellite group al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. nbc news reports tonight that a third significant al qaeda operative was also a party to communication discussing the attack. that third al qaeda leader expressed the desire to blow himself up in an attack, something he has not been allowed to do in the past. today a state department spokesperson was asked about the striking coincidence that the government made the threat public immediately after russia granted asylum to edward snowden, the nsa leaker. >> couldn't it be argued that suddenly we're hearing about this potential threat to u.s. interests and u.s. persons and property at a time when there's a lot of debate and a lot of criticism of this program as well as other nsa types of surveillance? >> i can assure you that that in no way at all, period, 100% affects how we evaluate threat information coming in, specifically in terms of this threat. >> republican peter king offered a
is never going to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wan
. >>> al qaeda's on the path to defeat, and bin laden is dead. >> al qaeda has been decimated. >> osama bin laden is dead. >> well, throughout the president's campaign for re-election last year we heard him talk about the decimation of al qaeda. but here's what the president said in his press conference on friday. >> core al qaeda is on its heels, has been decimated. but what i also said was that al qaeda and other extremists have metastasized into regional groups that can pose significant dangers. >> last week the state department closed 19 american outposts in the mideast and africa, and they evacuated the u.s. embassy in yemen. this week they warned americans not to travel to pakistan and they evacuated non-emergency personnel from the u.s. consulate in pakistan. all because of terrorist threats. gary burnson say decorated former cia officer who served as station chief on three separate occasions and led several of the agency's most important counterterrorism deployments. he spent his career hunting down al qaeda. he's also the author of a book, "jawbreaker: the attack on bin laden and a
to say about the state of al qaeda over the last year. >> today, al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. for al qaeda a shell of its former self. groups like aqap must be dealt with. the united states is never going to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. >> senator, a moment ago you said that al qaeda is on the rise. you're not suggesting that al qaeda is stronger than it was pre-9/11? >> i'm saying they have metastasized in a way they may pose great threats throughout the middle east, that they can destabilize nations, that they can commit acts of terror literally anywhere and there's the perception throughout the middle east that there's no american leadership, that's no policy, and then the various actors in the region are accommodating to that reality. and when they believe that, then you are going to see extremist elements on the rise and clearly they are throughout the middle east. the action of closing these embassies shows that they're able to mount threats everywhere in the middle east against the united states of america and they are playing in ways
of building seven. now that osama bin laden is dead and 911 is a decade behind us and more, i think a good argument can be made that the documents that the federal government has regarding the 911 attacks should be declassified and the truth will come out. host: you have to distinguish between those two things. bradley manning did leave an awful lot of classified information. evidently, it went to wikileaks and i think the court was correct in deciding it was not guilty of aiding the enemy because he had not directed that information to the enemy and that is what the statute says. that is how military justice rules agreed. with regard to the rest of it, i think it is clear that he did, in fact, leaked confidential information that was classified and therefore, he got punished. many people do great things sometimes get punished for them. i think back to the civil-rights era and help congressman john lewis was punished over and over again for acts of courage. this countryrs because the security system, the intelligence community and the military defense complex, military-industrial complex h
qaeda. sources are telling cnn that osama bin laden's successor, ayman al-zawahiri sent a letter saying, do something. the chatter set off all of this. nick payton walsh is watching this developing. nick, it has been five days since we first became aware of this terrorist threat and what we have seen today, the threat is clearly still ongoing. so why else would the u.s., why would briton, those folks be getting out of yemen? >> reporter: well, certainly the threat whilst being starved, anything from west africa, bangladesh to yemen, even though they thought it would be last sunday, it's ongoing. no one is clear where this is coming from. the state department is continuing to evaluate new information. that withdrawal of diplomatic staff you've been talking about, that has been emotional for a couple of days. the u.s. did repeat its normal travel advice to most americans to get out of yemen and never travel there anyway. a certain escalation on their part today. many asking is it possibly the drone strikes overnight against militants in yemen that may have contributed to that that now bri
/11 from osama bin laden, khalid shaikh mohammed, hijackers, before they formed al qaeda they belonged to the muslim brotherhood. it's the gateway drug to islamic terrorism and if you want to understand all of this madness and war on terror, all chaos that we're seeing now, you must first understand the muslim brotherhood. it started with them and that's why i wrote the book. >> you know, during the elections in egypt it was a fairly close election. muslim brotherhood won. mohamed morsi was put in place. governments around the world including the united states recognized that democratic leadership but as soon as they took over, they really started to carry out some very different policies than the ones that they were elected on. tell me about that and also what you see -- what is their larger goal? what does the muslim brotherhood seek? >> i was not surprised to see mohamed morsi become a modern day pharaoh once he took over in egypt. the creed they live by reads in part jihad is our way. dying in the way of allah is our highest hope. martyrdom. that creed never changed even when musli
that osama bin laden thought had the best chance of really being powerful and causing a long-term threat. the information is vague. it is from intercepts. although it's not, thank goodness, the meta data from the u.s. because there's no evidence of their being contact with somebody in the u.s. to be captured in that metadata. there's a reference in what's been heard to the enemy, not specific, which leads people to think it's probably the u.s., but could also be western europe. finally, there's some indication that what makes this so scary is that the chatter is going back and forth in part between al qaeda in yemen and core al qaeda which is loosely based still in pakistan, the tribal areas, afghanistan, maybe even the top figure in al qaeda now with bin laden gone, amman zawahiri. this looks scarier than some of the chatter they pick up. >> put this in a perspective over the past ten years, let's say. it used to be we heard of the chatter going on around the clock. we had a discussion yesterday on "meet the press" about the about of al qaeda to still strike, compared to five, six, seve
and when we killed osama bin laden. > right. there is the 10th anniversary of september 11. and killing osama bin laden. this is pretty unusual, this but embassies>> are closed quietly and have been for the past couple of days quietly. this is just politics what they have done him a to convince the american public that they are on top of things. quite frankly, it is had a painful effect for our allies and not made us look very good worldwide. >> we have time for a couple of questions. >> is the microphone working? just elevate my voice. i apologize. that is better, ok. there is an article in national review a few weeks ago by a commentator who had done an economic analysis of these issues, which i thought was interesting. a slightly different perspective. his observation was that the of a life saved is about $20 million. if you compare the cost of our tower -- our counterterrorism establishment, comes up about $20 million per american life saved in these efforts. and that the nsa's program, by his calculation, was costing in the range of around $100 million per life saved. his point, ap
their safety concerns in this case and look at what the president has done, he is responsible for killing osama bin laden, using ground strikes to decimate al qaeda, building on the policies of the bush administration regarding torture. host: judy is next, idaho, good morning. appreciate the call. caller: i have two things to say. the first is quick and for your producers. you read almost all twitter tweets these days and hardly any e-mails. it is very hard to express a complicated idea in less than 200 characters. i wish you would pay more attention to the e-mail. host: ok. caller: to the subject at hand, i take the present threat seriously. but not as seriously as they wouldn't if these agencies had not been a exaggerating and combing length the effectiveness of their programs and the thoroughness -- i think they have undermined their own credibility by doing so. i wish they would stop it so that we would know when something should be taken seriously and when it should not. host: judy, thank you for the call from idaho. at can join the conversation facebook as well. george says -- host: chris
. but i think is pretty clear what he was trying to say, which is anytime you can take osama bin laden off the board and kind of decimates the rest of their leadership, and by the way this administration has been extremely aggressive in the use of drone strikes in various places that we don't have boots on the ground. so i think we just have to continue to go after these people with the understanding it does not completely eliminate the threat. host: the disagreement over analyzing the threat and what it means -- this from the --nancial times" on friday terror alert returns al qaeda to center stage. u.s. claims of decimated enemy appear exaggerated. in that piece from friday's financial times. we are taking your calls and comments on this issue and the threat of al qaeda right now. our democratl on line from detroit, michigan. good morning, you were on with christopher hill. caller: good morning. withieve the whole thing the embassies and everything was a manufactured crisis because of the snowden release. once again, it is just like the terror alert. one native yellow, one day it is green
as it was pre-9/11. it's exactly what osama bin laden said it was. it's more of a change. if you read the magazine if you listen to the videos and all the statements that they point out, they sent their best bombmaker in the world to run part of their organization in algeria, because algeria was the training ground from which they sent their fighters from their different fronts from all over the world. we have this sense that we want to divide all of this to say yemen is the most dangerous area. tomorrow it's algeria, then north africa, and now syria. the fact is al qaeda's ideology is what's at the core. that's why they're called the base. the base is the uniting factor. and that's really where the threat comes from. they're taking more territory and spreading their ideology, and that's what makes them dangerous. >> lara logan, good to see you. thank you. >>> and a massive pipeline explosion this morning in illinois. it happened near erie. flames shot 300 feet in the air. they could be seen for 20 miles. people in 80 homes were forced out, but most are now aloud b
of osama bin laden come of the president's reelection campaign and you may know her from her great work with the politics team at usa today and the managing editor of the american journalism review. next to rachel is jen pendry and who is not on your program. originally we were going to have an al jazeera reporter here but she has gone over to the mainstream and is now working for cnn, making her ineligible for the panel. so jen kindly agreed to step in and we appreciate that. she is the white house reporter for the huffington post and covers leadership on capitol hill. she joined huffington post a couple of years ago and spent years covering the legislative and executive wrenches of government for "rollcall." probably a walk in the park for her because she started covering the texas state legislature. again, stepping in for camille, so thank you for that. next to jen is john stanton who also has "rollcall" roots rate he is the chair of buzz feed here in washington. then smith, the editor described him as a reporter's reporter with being in his veins. he's a third-generation news man an
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)